Online Exclusives

Industry Spotlight: Oleg Siniaguine, OSNovative Systems, Inc

OWM: Please provide a short description of your background, training, and experience.
  As a scientist, I have over 20 years of hands-on experience in the research and development of medical devices, including products for acute, chronic, and combat wound care. My technical expertise is in micro- and nano-technologies and system engineering. As an entrepreneur, I have extensive knowledge of the medical device industry and try to apply an innovative approach to business development and the introduction of new products. I am an inventor of over 100 United States (US) and international patents, many of which have served as a basis for new products, processes, and companies. I hold an MSEE and PhD in Technology.

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Safe Patient Lifting

Margaret Arnold, PT, CEES, CSPHP

  One of the biggest challenges for wound care, especially in the bariatric patient population, is adequate access to or support of a body part where a wound requires care. For example, sacral wounds require the patient to role or turn, and the caregiver is then in an awkward posture for prolonged periods of time performing the wound care task. For perineal wounds, access can be very challenging, requiring the caregiver to reach and bend at the waist, while holding arms in prolonged postures, with or without a holding force to move a leg out of the way if needed.

Industry Spotlight: Bill Cruise, 3M Critical & Chronic Care Division

OWM: Please describe your education, training, and work experiences that have prepared you for your current position as the VP of the Critical & Chronic Care Division at 3M.
  I have been with 3M’s Health Care Business for over 10 years, but I started my 3M career in the United Kingdom 28 years ago. I have worked in several different 3M businesses and divisions since that time, including the 3M Electronics and Energy Business and the 3M Industrial Business. I gained extensive healthcare experience while working in Europe, specifically in the United Kingdom, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Belgium, as well as in Singapore. Prior to joining 3M Critical & Chronic Care Solutions, I headed up 3M Unitek, our orthodontics business.

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Industry Spotlight: Randy Carson, Smith & Nephew

OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that have prepared you for your current position as Director of Government Affairs and Reimbursement at Smith & Nephew.
  I have worked more than 15 years in Biologic and Medical Device Government Affairs and Reimbursement capacities. For 15 years before entering the industry, I held a number of positions within healthcare administration.

OWM: What inspired you to start working with government affairs and reimbursement at Smith & Nephew?
  Smith & Nephew enjoys a positive reputation in providing high-quality, patient-focused products. As an industry representative for many years, I continually evaluated the Advanced Wound Management division and was fortunate to secure a position within the organization.

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CEO Spotlight: David Johnson of Alliqua

OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that prepared you for your current position as the CEO of Alliqua.
  I attended The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in Canada, and I am a Fellow of the Wharton School of Business at The University of Pennsylvania. I have been in the medical device industry for more than 30 years, the past 25 leading businesses in small, medium, and large company environments. Most recently before Alliqua, I spent 12 years with ConvaTec (Skillman, NJ), nine of those as the CEO and COO. We had a successful run during those years, building a strong company from $650 million in revenue when I joined in 2000 to $1.7 billion when I left. This was done through the efforts of great people who truly cared about the customer.

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CEO Spotlight: JR Locey of Hollister Incorporated

OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that prepared you for your current position at Hollister.
  I have been in the wound care industry for more than 20 years, holding various roles in sales, sales training, sales operations, sales management, marketing, business development, strategic development, and portfolio development. Currently, I am General Manager for the Wound Care business of Hollister Incorporated.

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Notes on Practice: Elder Abuse or Kennedy Terminal Ulcer?

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Notes on Practice

Kennedy Terminal Ulcers have been mistaken for elder abuse. This article reviews the literature and recognition relevant to the Kennedy Terminal Ulcer and provides several case studies that underscore classification, care, and outcomes with this end-of-life phenomenon. In one specific situation, a 42-year-old woman caring for her aunt was convicted of a felony and sentenced to 3 years in prison, demonstrating the controversy that persists with regard to the unavoidability of this particular ulcer.

Notes on Practice: Elder Abuse or Kennedy Terminal Ulcer?

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Kennedy Terminal Ulcer (KTU)

–Joy Schank, RN, MSN, ANP, CWOCN   Kennedy Terminal Ulcers have been mistaken for elder abuse. This article reviews the literature and recognition relevant to the Kennedy Terminal Ulcer and provides several case studies that underscore classification, care, and outcomes with this end-of-life phenomenon. In one specific situation, a 42-year-old woman caring for her aunt was convicted of a felony and sentenced to 3 years in prison, demonstrating the controversy that persists with regard to the unavoidability of this particular ulcer.

The Kennedy Terminal Ulcer

  History. The Kennedy Terminal Ulcer was first described in modern medical literature by Karen Lou Kennedy in 1989.1 Along with other healthcare workers at the Byron Health Center in Fort Wayne, IN, she noted that despite implementation of appropriate preventive measures, certain patients still exhibited skin breakdown in the sacral/coccygeal area. They further often noted the skin deteriorated rapidly, even during the course of a single day. Caregivers and family members alike were surprised at the sudden onset of this clinical phenomenon. This initial report was based on retrospective chart reviews of individuals with pressure ulcers. Upon further inquiry into how long these individuals lived after occurrence of this type of pressure ulcer, just over half (55.7%) died within 2 weeks to several months of discovery of their pressure ulcer. These observations were further supported by Hanson et al,2 who reported 62.5% of pressure ulcers in hospice patients occurred within 2 weeks of death.

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CEO Spotlight: Keith Galloway of BSN Medical

OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that prepared you for your current position as the president of BSN Medical.
  My academic background includes a BA from Shippensburg University (Shippensburg, PA), a Masters from Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA), and postgraduate business certification from Wharton University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA). I recently completed a doctoral residency in business with a focus in marketing and adaptive leadership. For the majority of my corporate career (the past 25 years), I have been privileged to work with leading medical companies — Roche Diagnostics, Agilent (formerly Varian), and now BSN Medical. Working in senior executive management globally in a variety of progressively challenging and multidiscipline technologies and markets has prepared me well for my current leadership responsibilities at BSN. I take a lot of pride in the opportunity to work with many talented and committed professionals, with the support of a leading global healthcare company. Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, I am currently responsible for commercial activities for the US and Canada.

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CEO Spotlight: Eitan Machover of Wellsense

OWM: Please describe the education, training, and work experiences that prepared you for your current position as the CEO of Wellsense.
  I spent 15 years with General Electric (GE), including 7 years with GE Healthcare. Most of my work was on the business development side, doing mergers and acquisitions. I moved to Israel in 1999 to integrate a couple of businesses GE had acquired there, and later that year I became the national executive, having overall responsibility for GE businesses in Israel. In 2003, I left GE to start MediTech Advisors, a medical device venture fund with two GE colleagues. We transitioned it into a second fund in 2006 with Ziegler Investments, a US Midwest Merchant Banking group. Right before joining Wellsense, I served as CEO of Ovalum Vascular, a medical device company that develops and produces technology designed for arterial conditions.

OWM: Why did you choose to lead this particular company?
  I decided I wanted to go back into operations after Ziegler MediTech was fully invested. I started working with a number of entrepreneurs, including Ran Poliakine, the founder of Wellsense, who are invested in a number of medical device companies. Wellsense is one of the companies in that cluster that is in the more advanced stages, and I decided to join them to help build the strategy for the group. After I completed the go-to-market strategy for Wellsense, the board asked me to come on as CEO to implement it.

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