Editorial Staff

Editor Barbara Zeiger

Assistant Editor Lauren Mateja

Web Content Coordinator Katherine Blessing

Editorial Correspondence

Barbara Zeiger, Editor, OWM

HMP Communications, 70 E Swedesford Rd
Suite 100, Malvern PA, 19355

Telephone: (800) 237-7285 or
(610) 560-0500, ext. 4244
Fax: (610) 560-0501

Email: bzeiger@hmpcommunications.com

June 2012 | Volume 58 - Issue 6

My Scope of Practice: Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

”Were there none who were discontented with what they have, the world would never reach for anything better.” – Florence Nightingale, English pioneer of modern nursing

  As many wound, ostomy, and continence nurses would tell you, they don’t treat just a wound. They treat the whole patient. This holds particularly true for Janette Dietzler, MSN, RN, CWS, COCN, FACCWS. As a manager, clinician, and educator, Janette is treating the wound, the patient, and all related issues with an eye to the big picture....

AAWC Thanks...

2012 Corporate Sponsors

  The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care expresses gratitude and deep appreciation to the following companies for their generous financial support in 2012. These companies are not only AAWC Members, but they also have contributed large amounts of funding to support AAWC initiatives. ...

Special to OWM: New Physician Wound Accreditation

  Over the past decade, the number of physicians indicating that wound care and management consumes an increasing and significant portion of their medical and/or surgical practices has increased dramatically. The need for a valued credential in the field has prompted multiple entities to develop quasi- and multidisciplinary examinations for which physicians can sit. Yet unlike the examinations of multidisciplinary organization, which are not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) as a valid examinations for physicians, the purpose and objective of the new American Board of Wound Medicine and Surgery (ABWMS) is quite different. ...

Atypical Ulcers: Wound Biopsy Results From a University Wound Pathology Service

Abstract

  Chronic wounds are an increasing health burden across the continuum of care and encountered by a wide variety of healthcare providers and physicians of all specialties. The majority of chronic wounds are caused by vascular insufficiency, neuropathy, or prolonged pressure. Wounds caused by other underlying health conditions or external factors such as radiation or spider bites are usually referred to as atypical....

Single-stage Reconstruction for Soft Tissue Defects: A Case Series

Abstract

  Various techniques for obtaining expedient aesthetic coverage of soft tissue defects with limited donor site morbidity have been developed, including the use of a dermal regeneration template (DRT) as the first step in a two-stage surgical approach. Use of DRT in reconstruction has increased as a result of reports suggesting improved cosmetic results and reduced scarring compared to split-thickness skin grafts (STSG), but this approach requires a return to the operating room. To evaluate outcomes of a single-stage procedure, a prospective evaluation of patients with complicated soft tissue defects measuring <200 cm2 was conducted....

SAWC Thanks You...

  SAWC thanks you for your dedication to wound care!

  The annual Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) Spring and SAWC Fall meetings are offering six wound care scholarships in association with several wound care organizations, as part of SAWC Gives Back program....

New Products and Industry News

Hydrofiber dressing introduced in Europe

  ConvaTec (Skillman, NJ), announced the availability of AQUACEL® EXTRA™ wound dressing with strengthening fiber in certain countries in Europe. The company introduced the new dressing during the 22nd Conference of the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) in Vienna, Austria, May 23–25, 2012. The new product is already available in several countries throughout Europe including Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, Ireland, and the Benelux and Nordic regions. The company has plans to continue to expand this launch throughout the European region throughout the year....

Editorial: Predictably Unpredictable

It’s something unpredictable but in the end it’s right… — Billie Joe Armstrong, Frank E. Wright III, and Michael Pritchard for Green Day (from the song “Good Riddance")

  The complexity of humans continues to confound, perplex, amaze, and keep researchers on their toes. Case in point: In this issue of Ostomy Wound Management, Gabriel and colleagues discuss the use of the art and science of wound healing, as well as a considerable dose of creativity, to devise a strategy for reducing the number of surgical procedures needed to close soft tissue defects. Controlling for wound size and certain comorbidities aside, the results of this case series are a testament to human ingenuity. Further comparative studies are warranted to test this approach in different wound types and more diverse populations. But often, study population heterogeneity can confound predictability. We continue to search for go-to protocols for healing that work in as many situations as possible....

Nutrition 411: Vitamin Supplementation: The Lingering Questions in Wound Healing

  The decision to recommend vitamin supplements to patients with wounds continues to be an open question for wound care and nutrition experts. Studies to date have not conclusively shown that routine multi- or individual vitamin supplementation in the absence of specific nutrient deficiencies hastens wound healing. The issue of vitamin supplementation is important and often discussed in the wound care world but is not extensively researched. This leaves many healthcare professionals to make treatment decisions based on the limited evidence they see in the available literature. In clinical situations, more often than not practitioners must rely on expert opinion and professional judgment as their guideline.1...

Continence Coach: Revitalizing the Health Belief Model in Support of Shared Decision-Making

  The Health Belief Model (HBM) is one of the first and certainly the most enduring of theories aimed at explaining health behavior change by means of social cognition. Developed nearly a half-century ago by Irwin W. Rosenstock of the US Public Health Service, the theory initially was applied to predict behavioral response to treatment of acutely or chronically ill patients.1 Although it has been expanded by others to predict more general health behaviors, its core concept remains the same: how an individual perceives a personal health threat, combined with his perception of the effectiveness of a treatment or intervention, will predict the likelihood such an action will be pursued.2 The theory is presented graphically in Figure 1.3 ...