A Descriptive Study of Commonly Used Postoperative Approaches to Pediatric Stoma Care in a Developing Country

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Author(s): 
Lofty-John C. Anyanwu, MBBS, MHPM, FWACS, FMCS, FEBPS; Aminu Mohammad, MBBS, FWACS, FICS; and Tunde Oyebanji, MBBS

Index: Ostomy Wound Manage. 2013;59(12):32–37.

Abstract

  Construction of an enterostomy is a common procedure in pediatric surgery. However, caring for the child with a stoma is challenging for parents in developing countries. Modern devices such as colostomy bags and accessories are expensive and not readily available. The purpose of this study was to describe methods of effluent collection and peristomal skin protection used by the mothers of colostomy patients. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted between January and December 2011 during the first three postoperative outpatient clinic visits among mothers of children who had a colostomy constructed in the authors’ hospital. The mothers of 44 children (27 males, 17 females, median age 3.3 months, range 2 days to 11 years) consented to participate. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the records, and mothers were interviewed and asked to describe their preferred methods of colostomy effluent collection and peristomal skin protection. The stomas also were inspected at each clinic visit. Anorectal malformations were the most common indication for a colostomy (32, 72.73%), followed by Hirschsprung’s disease (11, 25%). Forty-two (42) patients had a divided sigmoid colostomy (95.45%); two patients had a right loop transverse colostomy (4.55%). Nine mothers alternated between two different collection methods. The diaper collection method was described most frequently (22 out of 53; 41.51%), followed by wraparound waistbands (19; 35.85%) and improvised colostomy bags (12; 22.64%). Peristomal skin excoriations were commonly seen within the first 3 weeks postsurgery and had mostly disappeared by the week 6 postoperative visit. Petrolatum jelly was the most commonly used barrier ointment. These locally available, acceptable, and affordable collection methods may be useful for children in other developing countries.

Keywords: descriptive study, stoma care, pediatrics, developing countries, colostomy

Potential Conflicts of Interest: none disclosed

Introduction

  A colostomy is an artificial colocutaneous fistula created to divert feces and flatus to the exterior.



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